Time to RUNAMOK in the shop!

Runamok-syrups-on-weathered-wood

New at AllSpice: we’ve started carrying gourmet maple syrups by Vermont producer RUNAMOK.

Runamok-aged-in-liquor-barrelsRunamok makes a delicious range of infused, barrel-aged and smoked maple syrups. Everything the company produces is small-batch, and completely organic.

Among the infused and smoked maple syrups, we have Elderberry Infused ($17/250ml), Cinnamon-Vanilla Infused ($17/250ml), Cardamom Infused ($17/250ml) (here at the shop, it’s everyone’s favorite), and Pecan Wood Smoked maple syrups ($17/250ml).

To make barrel-aged offerings, Runamok takes recently emptied barrels from local distillers and adds their maple syrup, letting it age for up to a year. This lets the spirit to impart its signature flavor without adding any alcohol. We have fun flavors here at AllSpice like Bourbon Barrel Aged ($20/250ml), Rye Barrel Aged ($20/250ml), Rum Barrel Aged maple syrups ($20/250ml).

We also have some 4- pack Runamok Maple Syrup assortments($20 each) with themes like Cheese Pairing, Infused + Barrel, Day + Night., and Smoke + Barrel.

RUNAMOK-maple-syrups-sample-variety

Here’s how Runamok makes their exquisite products:


runamok-maple-tree-tappingRunamok maintains a sugarbush maple “forest” of 81,000 maple taps, each placed by hand every season.

The folks at Runamok explain that, once the sap comes into the Sugarhouse, the sap is filtered through a reverse osmosis (RO) machine, which removes up to 90% of the water from the sap before boiling, and using 1/8 the amount of fuel previously needed to make concentrated syrup.

After being concentrated, the sap is sent to the evaporator where it is boiled down to syrup, an intense and the hours-long process. A run can last for up 20 hours and requires “constant fiddling with the equipment.” The last step of the process sends the finished syrup through a filter press to create a clear, amber liquid.

Did you know? The color of maple syrup is lightest at the beginning of the year and continues to darken over the course of the season. The taste also changes as the winter gives way to spring and temperatures rise.

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